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Dandie Dinmont Terrier


General Information - Dandie Dinmont Terrier


Group:
Terrier

Size:
medium

Lifespan:
11-13 years

Exercise:
moderate

Grooming:
moderate

Trainability:
hard

Watchdog ability:
high

Protection ability:
very low

Area of Origin:
border of Scotland and England

Date of Origin:
1700s

Other Names:
none

Original Function:
otter and badger hunting



History

The Dandie Dinmont is an old terrier breed from the border area between England and Scotland. It was probably developed from the now extinct Scotch Terrier (not to be confused with today's Scottish Terrier), and the Skye Terrier. Raised mainly by gypsies and used by farmers to kill vermin, the Dandie Dinmont was named after the character in the famous novel "Guy Mannering" by Sir Walter Scott back in the 1800s. They still retain their talents for catching vermin. The Dandie has also been used for hunting rabbit, otter and badger. By instinct it has always been a great Mouse catcher. And it is an enemy of martens, weasels, and skunks. An amusing-looking dog (long body, very short legs, toupee on the head); it has become a most sought-after companion dog.

Temperament

Dandie Dinmont Terrier’s hate being babied and would rather be treated as though they were regular sized dogs. Plucky and fun loving, the Dandie Dinmont Terrier can be stubborn and does not like to be obedience trained. This little dog has a big bark for its size and is protective of the family home. Dandie Dinmont Terriers may not do well with other pets unless raised with them from puppyhood. This breed is highly independent and may be reserved with strangers.

Upkeep

The Dandie enjoys the chance to hunt around and explore in a safe area and needs a moderate walk to stay in condition. It does best as an indoor/outdoor dog, and should sleep inside. Its coat needs combing twice weekly, plus regular scissoring and shaping. Shaping for show dogs is done on an almost continual (but light) basis; that for pets can be done by stripping or clipping about four times a year.