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Komondor


General Information - Komondor


Group:
Working

Size:
Large

Lifespan:
10-12 years

Exercise:
Medium

Grooming:
Medium

Trainability:
Medium

Watchdog Ability:
Very high

Protection Ability:
Very high

Area of Origin:
Hungary

Date of Origin:
Ancient times

Other Names:
Hungarian Sheepdog

Original Function:
Sheep guardian



History

The Komondor, sometimes referred to as the Hungarian Sheepdog, originated during the 800s to guard sheep, having been brought to Hungary by the Magyar tribe when they came from the East to settle there. Its coat helps it blend in with the sheep until it pounces on an unsuspecting wolf. The thickness of the coat also protects it from attacks from predators and from the elements. The Komondor is similar in appearance to its Hungarian cousin, the Puli, but much larger and more heavy-boned, and a very impressive dog due to its height and the bulk of its coat.

Temperament

Bred as an independent protector of livestock, the Komondor is true to its heritage. It is an independent thinker and can be stubborn or domineering. It is not for meek owners who can be dominated; socialisation is essential. It is reserved with strangers and possibly aggressive toward strange dogs. It is good with other pets and especially livestock. In fact, it is happiest when it has something or someone to watch over. Although usually calm and quiet, it is utterly fearless when the need arises. As a natural guardian, it is protective of children in its own family, but it may at times misunderstand rough-and-tumble games of visiting children.

Upkeep

The Komondor needs daily exercise in the form of long walks or short romps. Swimming is not a good idea because of the time it takes the coat to dry. It may also be difficult to keep the coat clean in some areas. This breed does not like warm weather. It can live outdoors in temperate to cool weather. The Komondor is non-shedding but not carefree. Its cords must be regularly separated or they will look like flat mats, and its coat tends to hold dirt; bathing is time-consuming and drying takes as much as a day. Care of the coat in non-show dogs is far less extensive. Pets can be clipped but then lose part of the breed’s unique appeal. Note that it may take a dog up to two years of age before cords form.