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Xoloitzcuintle


General Information - Xoloitzcuintle

NZKC - Breed Standard - Xoloitzcuintle - Non-Sporting Xoloitzcuintle Non-Sporting                                             Origin Mexico   Date of publication of the officail valid Standard 08.10.2012.   Utilization: Standard Size - watchdog, Intermediate Size - watchdog, Minature Size - companion dog.   FCI Classification: Group - 5 Spitz and Primitive Types, Section - 6 Primitive Type, Without working trial.   Preamble: The gene that produces the absence of hair is dominant. Nevertheless, some puppies are born with a coat. The hairless to hairless breeding will produce the least numbers of coated dogs therefore this has been preferred. It has been proven that this breeding maintains and improves the quality of the breed. For providing genetic diversity, well-constructed coated Xoloitzcuintles, with excellent type, conformation, standard accepted colours and coat, may be used for breeding purposes. The breeding between two coated Xoloitzcuintles is not permitted. Xoloitzcuintle coated breeding stock must be the offspring of registered parents with at least three generations of hairless to hairless breeding. The coated variety must be evaluated as a true breed at dog shows, to be able to be bred to hairless dogs only.   Brief Historical Summary: Their origin dates far back in history. The meat of the Xoloitzcuintle or Xoloitzcuintli in Nahuatl language, Xoloitzcuintle in Spanish was considered a delicacy in pre Hispanic Mexico, eaten by the indigenous Mexicans in special ceremonies as a ritual to their beliefs and was regarded as a representative of the god "Xolotl", from which its name obviously originates. Its task was to guide the souls of the dead to their eternal destination. Therefore the dog became scarce, reaching a point of near extinction. The Federación Canófila Mexicana (Mexican Kennel Club) rescued this native breed and has used the Xoloitzcuintle on its logo since 1940. The hairless variety of the breed is also known by the name “perro pelón mexicano" (Mexican Hairless Dog). The coated variety was known by the natives as "itzcuintle".
 

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