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CENTRAL TERRITORIES SIBERIAN HUSKY CLUB

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Central Territories Siberian Husky Club


The Central Territories Siberian Husky Club was established in 1987 with the purpose to promote and protect the Siberian Husky, and to advance the interest in working, showing and obedience with an emphasis on maintaining the racing qualities of the breed.

The club offers a great opportunity to meet new friends, share information and knowledge about the breed, and participate in club events such as walks, social gatherings, showing and racing.

From sled dog racing’s humble beginning in 1986, when the Otago Siberian Husky Club ran the first race at Tairei Mouth with three teams, to present day, racing has come a long way. The Central Territories Siberian Husky Club has been a part of that journey, running two major race meetings, the Autumn Burn and the Sled Dog Derby, the first long distance race in New Zealand.

The Autumn Burn was traditionally held on Queens Birthday weekend at Waitarere Forest (north of Levin). The Sled Dog Derby was held during the last weekend of July also at Waitarere Forest. The Sled Dog Derby was established in 1990 racing over a 20.6km trail. For six years the Derby was the longest race in New Zealand and was nationally recognised for being well run and organised, and was considered one of New Zealand’s premier events. In 1999 Central Territories proudly celebrated the 10th anniversary of the Sled Dog Derby, with some mushers from the inaugural race still competing.

2009 saw the 20th anniversary of the Sled Dog Derby, the Derby also held the New Zealand Federation of Sled Dog Sports Dryland Champs.

One of the greatest achievements of the club is its newsletter, which is published every second month. With members around New Zealand, the newsletter really is the voice of the club. With a bit of something in it for everyone, the newsletter aims to be educational and enjoyable and provides a source of information on all aspects of the breed.

With the breed becoming more popular and so many people enquiring about where to get a puppy, CTSHC devised an information pack to help educate people about the different, and sometimes very difficult, traits of the breed. This has proved to be of enormous value, as once people have read through the information they realise that in a lot of ways the Siberian is not an easy dog to live with, and maybe they should get another breed that’s a little easier! In this way CT is hoping to reduce the number of dogs for rehousing by educating people before they get a dog and find they can’t cope with it.